The Earl Not Taken by A. S. Fenchel

I’m so happy to be here. Thank for having me.
I’ve been having my books published since 2011. Each time I finish a book or series, I worry how I

will come up with something new and interesting to write about. Every single time, my worries are unfounded. I write about strong women in a time when women were the possessions of the men in their lives. Despite the fact that I have been happily married for most of my adult life, I write about women who don’t really want to marry. I give them the opportunity to avoid the one thing society has been drilling into their heads from birth; find a man and marry well.

When looking for the inspiration for The Wallflowers of West Lane, I loved the idea of the friendships between women, and I feel like it’s not explored enough in Regency Romance. There are a lot of books about men who went to school together, formed an alliance and remained friends, but few about women and how strong that bond can me.
In high society of the Regency Era, often young ladies were raised in small villages on estates where they came into contact with few women. They would at the age of fifteen or sixteen have a coming out and begin to hunt for husbands. To give my ladies a chance to develop, I created a fictional girls’ boarding school where misbehaved ladies might be sent away for a few years as punishment.
For The Wallflowers of West Lane it was the best three years of their lives. 
About the Author

A.S. Fenichel gave up a successful IT career in New York City to pursue her lifelong dream of being a professional writer. She adores writing stories filled with love, passion, desire, magic and maybe a little mayhem tossed in for good measure. Originally from New York, she grew up in New Jersey, and now lives in Missouri with her real-life hero, her wonderful husband and two temperamental cats.

WEBSITE & SOCIAL LINKS:

Website: http://asfenichel.comTwitter: https://twitter.com/asfenichelFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/A.S.Fenichel

About the Book

Left standing on the side while their contemporaries marry into society, four young ladies forge a bond to guard each other from a similar fate . . .

Finishing school failed to make a proper lady of Penelope Arrington. But as a Wallflower of West Lane, Poppy has a far more vital role—she and her three best friends have made a pact to protect each other from the clutches of dangerous, disreputable men. So when one of them is about to be married off to a duke sight unseen, Poppy makes it her mission to divine the prospective husband’s true character. If only she didn’t require the aid of London’s most unsuitable rake.

Rhys Draper, Earl of Marsden, has known the headstrong Poppy since she was a young girl, naïve to the ways of men. To her eternal chagrin—and to his vague amusement—they have been at odds over the memory of their embarrassing first encounter all these years. Now, with his services in need, Rhys sees a chance to finally clear the air between them. Instead, he is surprised by the heat of their feelings. If the two do not tread carefully, they may end up in a most agreeably compromising position . . .

ORDER YOUR COPY

Amazon → https://amzn.to/2P0nS6S

 Barnes & Noble → https://bit.ly/32a3J3X

KOBO → https://bit.ly/2uPJEDE

Google Play → https://bit.ly/2Hr2DqD

I wrote The Wallflowers of West Lane, to delve into the friendship between four extraordinary women. Each of the women: Poppy, Faith, Mercy and Aurora have distinct personalities and issues to be dealt with. During the writing of the stories it became obvious that those issues are still relevant to women in today’s society, which is at once interesting and sad.

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